The email was titled: "The bottom line: States demanding proof public school teachers are effective in the classroom."

 

Writing the headline was easy. Seeing that proof provided is a much bigger chore.

DeWayne Bartels The email was titled: "The bottom line: States demanding proof public school teachers are effective in the classroom."
 
Writing the headline was easy. Seeing that proof provided is a much bigger chore.

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The email was titled: "The bottom line: States demanding proof public school teachers are effective in the classroom."
 
Writing the headline was easy. Seeing that proof provided is a much bigger chore.

"Last month, the Louisiana state officials approved a plan to evaluate K-12 classroom teachers based on student performance. This marks a significant rethinking of how a teacher’s performance is assessed.vLouisiana’s outgoing evaluation process gives almost all teachers favorable reviews, which doesn’t jibe with the dismal results produced by the state’s public education system. A 2011 federal report finds only 22 percent of Louisiana’s students perform at 'proficient' levels," the email from the Education Action Group said. .
 
 
The AP writing about this said 50 percent of the new evaluation process, which takes effect next school year, will be based on “growth in student achievement.”
Louisiana’s educators will receive one of three ratings - highly effective, effective, or ineffective.
 
The National Council on Teacher Qality says any teacher rated as ineffective “will be placed in an intensive assistance program and then must be formally evaluated.”
 
Teachers who fail to show improvement could be fired after two years.
 
There is no surprise that Louisiana teacher's unions have called the plan "flawed" and a "fiasco."
 
" Louisiana, Ohio and Oklahoma are part of the growing trend toward injecting more accountability into public education. Parents and taxpayers in 23 states have passed laws requiring that teachers be evaluated based – at least partly – on whether or not they are getting the job done in the classroom," The EAG wrote in the email.
 
Sandi Jacobs, vice president of the National Council on Teacher Quality, said, “There’s a growing realization that the old way of evaluating teachers is really dysfunctional,” she said. “There was a lot of activity about teacher evaluations in 2011.The states saw that this is not a taboo topic anymore."
 
The states that make student achievement a major part of teacher evaluations, according to the EAG, include: Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island and Tennessee, as well as D.C. public schools.