|
|
Woodford Times - Peoria, IL
  • Major Crimes Creator James Duff Blogs "Letting It Go"

  • You cannot see the justice system from space; you cannot hug it; you cannot shake its hand or climb its walls; it is an abstract construct deriving its power from our collective resolve to settle society's conflicts through the administration of law. Though a primary pillar of civilization, the justice system was...
    • email print
  • You cannot see the justice system from space; you cannot hug it; you cannot shake its hand or climb its walls; it is an abstract construct deriving its power from our collective resolve to settle society's conflicts through the administration of law. 
    Though a primary pillar of civilization, the justice system was not designed to succeed for individuals, but in the aggregate. Indeed, one could conceivably argue that it is our commitment to support the justice system even when it functions improperly — even when it does less well than it should - that endows it with more secular force than any other institution in our daily life.
    Still, the expectation of justice runs so deeply in our culture that when charges of sexual assault are dismissed over a technicality, our sense of order is betrayed. How could a known rapist, with at least two victims, escape his destiny? Or does he? Since we begin our story at a grisly crime scene featuring his body, his escape must be considered as something less than complete.
    Killing someone whom a judge and jury have failed to convict is murder. Officers-of-the-Court cannot allow individuals to pursue extrajudicial executions, since that road leads to the ruin of everything they are sworn to protect. Like a good marriage, the law must be loved for its faults as well as its virtues, or else dissolve.
    Count on Captain Raydor to pursue her oath.  Sharon's adherence to the rules displays an active understanding of her own role in the legal system, and an intention to fulfill her role to the utmost of her ability. In Letting it Go, the Captain reserves her sympathies for her youngest detective, Amy Sykes, and her rapidly maturing teenage ward, Rusty Beck, both of whom she must press to get better confessions from alcoholic offenders.
    Written by the powerfully combined talents of Jim Leonard & Damani Johnson, Letting it Go represents their extraordinarily fine work, and the genius of our director, Steve Robin (who has compiled a record of sustained brilliance). I don't want to give away anything more about this episode except to say that our guest stars show up with their A+ game, and our series regulars have never been better.
    The expectation of justice is a powerful theme for a drama, allowing us a rare opportunity to refract the amazing capacity of the law through the prism of its vulnerability.
    Next week, we settle a long simmering identity issue involving Rusty Beck and welcome the return of Jon Tenney as Special Agent Fritz Howard, and Bill Brochtrup as behavioral police psychologist, Dr. Joe, both of whom find themselves inside a Major Crimes investigation involving a murder suspect protected by diplomatic immunity.
    Until then- James Duff
      • calendar