Heartline the heart of Eureka

Sean McGowan
Heart House.
The same can be said of 2012 with expenses coming out to $1,167.09 and amount raised by the kettles at $1,620. But the problem in keeping up with the needs of the less fortunate comes from other outlets.
Shay Carter, Heartline and Heart House executive director, said some of the responsibility falls on the individual enlisting for services.
“People have to think, 'Ok, how do we still keep the lights, pay the rent, and still get toilet paper?'” Carter said.
In other words, Heartline and Heart House can only go so far to help people. The person seeking help needs to use the services wisely.
“As long as they are working the program, they can keep receiving services,” Carter said.
Part of working the program involves attending bible studies and searching for employment. Carter said some people who take advantage of different charitable organizations will invent a system where they never need to pay their own bills.
“The hard part is getting people to change their behavior,” Carter said.
Heartline and Heart House partners with the Center for Prevention of Abuse in providing women suffering abusive relationships with housing. Eventually, Heartline and Heart House is able to find permanent housing for these women because of the Woodford County Housing Authority's assistance.
“We wouldn't have been able to provide the kind of housing for people that we did without (the Woodford County Housing Authority's) help,” Carter said.
Though Carter continues to perform her job as executive director of the organization, she said jobs need to start opening up before things will start to improve.
“I don't think it's going to get any better until we get better jobs,” Carter said.

Prescriptions, transportation, rent, electric bills — these are a few of the expenses Heartline and Heart House will assist people with who need to get back on their feet.

Heartline and Heart House is located at 300 Regan Drive, Eureka. The organization has served Woodford County for 30 years.

In 2011, the amount provided to Heartline and Heart House came out to $1,595. Expenses totaled to $1,102.04. The difference of $492.96 between these two numbers shows that the Salvation Army kettles gathered enough money to support Heartline and Heart House.

The same can be said of 2012 with expenses coming out to $1,167.09 and amount raised by the kettles at $1,620. But the problem in keeping up with the needs of the less fortunate comes from other outlets.

Shay Carter, Heartline and Heart House executive director, said some of the responsibility falls on the individual enlisting for services.

“People have to think, 'Ok, how do we still keep the lights, pay the rent, and still get toilet paper?'” Carter said.

In other words, Heartline and Heart House can only go so far to help people. The person seeking help needs to use the services wisely.

“As long as they are working the program, they can keep receiving services,” Carter said.

Part of working the program involves attending bible studies and searching for employment. Carter said some people who take advantage of different charitable organizations will invent a system where they never need to pay their own bills.

“The hard part is getting people to change their behavior,” Carter said.

Heartline and Heart House partners with the Center for Prevention of Abuse in providing women suffering abusive relationships with housing. Eventually, Heartline and Heart House is able to find permanent housing for these women because of the Woodford County Housing Authority's assistance.

“We wouldn't have been able to provide the kind of housing for people that we did without (the Woodford County Housing Authority's) help,” Carter said.

Though Carter continues to perform her job as executive director of the organization, she said jobs need to start opening up before things will start to improve.

“I don't think it's going to get any better until we get better jobs,” Carter said.